13. Sep, 2018

Sharks and rays of Argentine waters - The sixth article

Sharks and rays of Argentine waters - The sixth article



"The School Shark: an almost extinct shark in Argentine waters" in Spanish 

(El Cazón: un tiburón casi extinguido)

in El Librito del Sur Nº6

A short resume from an article by Fernando Reis, SEI's executive director, published the 5th September 2018 on "EL LIBRITO DEL SUR" in Argentina:

According to the IUCN Red List, in the Southwest Atlantic the G. galeuspopulation is subject to intensive fishing throughout its distribution where this speciesis already considered Critically Endangered (CR), and without major and urgent management measures the situation for this shark species in the Southwest Atlantic is set to become even worse. 

A shy species very appreciated in some kitchens,the School Shark (Galeorhinus galeus)spends his life moving between the coasts of Brazil and Argentina. Unfortunately, too many times, it ends up dried out for traditional Easter meals. It is a relatively small shark, which lives in coastal areas of temperate waters of all oceans but which is on the verge of extinction in Eastern South American waters.

At the global level, the Cazón G. galeus is classified in the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species of Extinction as a vulnerable species (code VU). However, according to the IUCN Red List and due to an unregulated overfishing in the Southwest Atlantic, the G. galeus population is already considered Critically Endangered (CR), and without major and urgent management measures the situation for this shark species in the Southwest Atlantic is set to become even worse. 

The decreases registered along the last decades have been more notorious in Brazil and Uruguay; but, this important Houndshark continue to be fished without any restrictions. If these predatory sharks of South American Atlantic ecosystems disappear, they can cause serious declines in some species of commercial importance, just the opposite of what could be desired.

Without urgent measures, the situation in this area of the Atlantic will worsen until its final disappearance. To stop this, it's absolutely necessary to start immediately to limit the fishing of this shark species.

Special thanks to:

  • Alejo Irigoyen and Gastón Trobbiani- Researchers at the Center for the Study of Marine Systems (CESIMAR) and the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CCT CENPAT - CONICET), Puerto Madryn, Chubut, Argentina.